The Many Uses Of Thermal Night Vision Technology

Thermal night vision makes use of temperature to spot a person, animal, or object. This tool detects heat and produces images that reflect the placement of that heat. Most often incorporated into night vision goggles, the technology is used by law enforcement officers and hunters. Though less common, thermal night vision is also being incorporated into video cameras for better night shots. Another place one might find thermal imaging is in detecting mold or poor insulation.

Thermal imaging, especially in the use of night vision goggles, allows a person to see another being without being seen. Unlike older versions of the technology or using flashlights, the light is not visible to the other party. Current gear is also much lighter than previous models.

Law enforcement officers might use thermal night vision to tail a fugitive or investigate the scene of an accident. Often the technology is attached to law enforcement vehicles. This equipment shows heat images from a distance, so long before a vehicle is apprehended; an officer can see the make and model of a car. Military personnel and firefighters also use the technology for their duties.

Thermal night vision is used for security cameras. Security cameras with thermal imaging technology can detect activity in any area, even if it is not well lit. Many security systems come with a simple, wireless set-up and are low cost.

Photographers and videographers also make use of thermal night vision. Photographers use it to take digital SLR images under low light or even during the darkest time of night. Movie directors also use this technology to film night scenes.

Thermal night vision is useful for construction workers and home inspectors. Since thermal night vision products detect heat they can also spot places where there is not enough heat. That helps a person see if the insulation in a building has worn down or is missing. It can also detect radiation leaks.

The same technology aids workers in detecting the potential for moisture and mold problems. If there is a vast difference between the temperature inside and the temperature outside, it can create moisture problems. Inspectors can use thermal imaging to compare the temperatures inside and outside a home, spotting and potentially preventing mold and mildew problems.

Uses for thermal night vision abound. Some common uses are law enforcement, mold detection, photography, and security. It is also used in hunting, particularly in the use of thermal night vision goggles. The technology works by detecting heat and projecting images from the data. In law enforcement, it can be used to catch suspected criminals.